• Us vs Them: Does Human Nature Divide or Unite?
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    Everywhere in the world, people exhibit certain common patterns of behavior. We dub these patterns inherently human, and we recognize them as the bond which ties us together. Even so, these patterns can often be divisive and work against human togetherness. Take the human tendency to be tribal for instance. We may think of tribalism […]

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  • Uber: Is It Safe?
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    Richard Lomotey, an assistant professor at the Pennsylvania State University was arrested for harassing and attempting to kidnap while driving two women via Uber last Saturday, May 11th. According to the two women, while driving them, Richard Lomotey made comments about how attractive both of them are and further stated that he is single and […]

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  • Andrew Yang and Universal Basic Income
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    Among all the president candidates in 2020, Andrew Yang stands out as the only person of Asian descent running as a Democrat. Although he is an entrepreneur instead of a career politician, he uses this to his advantage as he claimed that he will save the US’s future economy. He approaches future economic issues through […]

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  • The Culture of Music
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    When I was 7, in 2012, I bought the CD for Green Day’s Dookie. I saved up my 25 cent weekly allowance for months, and finally I was able to purchase the treasured music from Target, complete with a song packet and 12 inch poster. Besides my relatively odd taste in pop-punk music as a […]

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  • Ayanna Pressley and Identity in Politics
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    Last month, I had the privilege of seeing Representative Ayanna Pressley (MA-07) speak at Tufts University’s Tisch College of Civic Life. After a few minutes of pleasantries, Pressley began to give an autobiography of her political journey, beginning as a scheduler for Senator John Kerry, serving as the first African-American woman on Boston’s City Council, […]

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  • Moral Hazard: Should It Affect Public Policy?
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    Moral hazard—the disincentive to protect against risks due to being shielded from the consequences—should definitely affect public policy. When moral hazard encourages people to be reckless—be it by opioid users with access to Narcan or drivers with reliable car insurance—the simple solution is to eliminate the moral hazard. Unfortunately, this answer does not address the […]

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  • Let’s Talk about Earth Day
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    Consistently falling on April 22nd, the annual event has been celebrated since 1970, and with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) beginning operations a little over seven months afterward (12/02/1970), this first Earth Day may have been the beginning of modern environmentalism. Back in the ‘70s, Earth Day was meant to increase awareness for oil spills, […]

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  • An Art Historical Analysis: Cordoba vs. Angkor Wat
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    Constructed in 631 A.D. in southern Spain, the Great Mosque of Cordoba is an Islamic center for worship. Built in 1100 A.D. in Cambodia, the Angkor Wat is a Hindu temple dedicated to Vishnu. Upon first glance, the two buildings cannot be any more different: one is Islamic, the other is Hindu; one is in […]

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  • What Does the Mueller Report Mean for Trump?
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    After almost two years of subpoenas, interviews, and fact-gathering, all amid both subtle and vocal attacks by Donald Trump and Fox News, the Mueller investigation has finally ended. In May of 2017, a week after Trump abruptly fired FBI director James Comey—thus ending his probe into potential collusion with the Russian government in the 2016 […]

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